07
Mar

HAANG AND BYUN

taekwondo training

1.HAANG

HAANG represents a frame. It is stable, simulating the parts of our lives that are basically unchanging and predictable. To illustrate, picture the rising of the sun and moon. They follow a specific pattern and we know, for instance, that the every 29 days the shape of the moon will be identical (whether full, new, waning crescent or waxing crescent). However we recognize that there is change within Haang. The moon changes shape, and the seasons change. However, these changes follow consistent patterns. Humans are very familiar. HAANG can represent the inevitable parts of life (birth and death) as well as the foundational structure of Martial Arts (basic mental and physical aspects)

2.BYUN

BYUN represents change. The unexpected elements in our lives that occuror the variety that we pursue are examples of BYUN. We tend to seek outchange because without it life can be boring. An example is trying out all sorts of different hobbies or sports. The downside of excessive BYUN is that learning is more superficial. We become good at many things but masters of none. Even within Martial Arts, leaning too much on Byun can actually delay progress. It can be tempting to do sparring one day, Kigong the next, pad kicking the next, and so forth, instead of choosing one aspect and discovering subtle ways to improve on it.

The ideal combination is harmony (Taeguk) of both HAANG and BYUN. With true concentration and sincerity, one can find BYUN within HAANG. Even what seems routine often time is not if one observescarefully. No two sunsets are the same. No two snowflakes are identical. Every martial arts class is different if you increase your level of awareness.

Written by Master Yoo, JM
Edited by Hyun Sa Myung Duk (Drew Vanover) and Chun Shim (Carlos Stern)