THE BLOG

22
Sep

2017 October Black Belt Test Candidates Information

  1. How to prepare for the Outdoor Test?

Backpack running 1.8 mile + middle distance running + short distance running + free style kicking + duck walking etc.

  • Start jogging 2 times per week between 1.5 – 2 miles each time
  1. What is the written report?
  • Refer to the Black Belt Test Booklet
  • Due on the day of Outdoor Test, Sunday10/8/2017
  1. When to return the meditation chart?
  • Only Black Belt, not a Bodan Red Belt. 10/8/2017
  1. How to prepare for the sparring test?
  • Participate in sparring classes
  • You must bring your own gear or borrow from someone for the test
  1. Practice holding posture at home
  • Push up -4 minutes, may choose to hold additional time for a higher grade
  1. Attend 4 classes of practice sessions (DO NOT MISS)
  • You will be aware of what you need to do and what the flow of the Indoor test will be  
  • Sat 9/30/2017 1 pm – 4 pm at Tarrytown Headquarters
  • Sat 10/7/2017 1 pm – 4 pm at Tarrytown Headquarters
  • 2 more classes will be at your location
  1. Outdoor Test Sunday,10/8/2017 6:30 am
  • Map with starting station will be given on 10/7/2017 after special class
  • We do not wait if you are late
  1. Curriculum guide test
  • Will be at your location
  1. Indoor Test 10/14/2017 2 pm – 5 pm
  • Wear full uniform (No T-shirts)
  • Bring sparring gear and mouth piece
  1. Read Black Belt Test Booklet for details about the test
  • What to eat, what to wear, etc
  • How to manage your mind
19
Sep

CONCENTRATION

Concentration and its development provide many benefits in daily life as well as in Tae Kwon Do. Having a better capacity to concentrate allows for greater focus while performing tasks at work or school, or doing chores around the house. It enables learning and retention of new things.

There are two types of concentration cultivation; through tension and through relaxation. Tense concentration can occur when an individual is in a high pressure situation like attempting to score a winning penalty goal in a soccer game, taking a test, or trying to meet a deadline. Relaxed concentration is commonly experienced when in meditation or doing simple activities like walking in nature, or cleaning with mindfulness.

In both, the capacity for concentration and focus increases. The difference is in the effects and the duration. In a tense situation, one’s concentration rises quickly. However it is not sustained at that level for long and once the tense situation is over, the concentration drops to at, or even sometimes below, the starting point. The physical after effects typically leave one feeling drained, tired, and mentally foggy.

When building concentration through relaxation, the focus takes a longer time to develop. However this allows for a steady growth over time. While there are still peaks and valleys in the capacity of concentration, the overall trend is that one’s concentration grows for a prolonged period. Through relaxed concentration, the level of concentration cultivated rarely diminishes and the physical after effects are more positive; typically instilling a sense of calmness and clarity.

One of the effects meditation can have on a person is lengthening their breath. With deep breathing comes a slower heart rate and calm mind. All of these things relax the sympathetic nervous system and stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system. This relaxed state of concentration can be highly beneficial to balance out the normal stresses our body may experience from work, school, and family responsibilities.

Another point to consider is that there are changes in the brainwaves that occur for each method. Our concentration will impact the brain as well as other parts of the physical body. The universal vibration is set to 7.5 Hz, the natural frequency of infants. It is thought this attunes them to the universe and is why they are happy and inquisitive.

In the normal day to day living, our brainwaves are in the Beta range (13-30 Hz). In this range, attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world in the condition of tension and instability.

Below that is the Alpha range (8 to 12 Hz) which shows up when we are calm and awake, but the brain is resting.

Below that is the Theta range (4 to 8 Hz) which is where our brains go into sleep and deep meditation.

And the lowest for our purposes is the Delta range (0.2 to 3 Hz) which is where deep sleep and the deepest of meditative states occurs.

By changing the frequency our brains operate at, we can facilitate better learning and cultivate more capacity for concentration. How we manage our brain frequency (either through tension or relaxation) determines the long term benefits of heightened concentration.

— Spoken by JiDoJa YOO, JM
— Written by Hyun Sa Myung Duk (Drew Vanover) and Shin Min (Patrick Malonso); Edited by Hyun Sa Chun Shim (Carlos Stern)

08
Sep

Step up to the Challenge!

TOP POWER BREAKING Tournament

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

2:00 – 3:30PM * YOO’S MARTIAL ARTS TARRYTOWN

  • OPEN TO ALL BELTS * AGES 6 and UP
  • Total participants: Only 36 Elite Competitors
  • 3 Different Divisions
  • 12 Competitors in Each Division
  • 1st 2nd 3rd  4th Places will be Awarded for Each Division
  • One Grand Champion Out of 36 Elite Competitors
  • Competitors from 3 Locations of Hong Ik Martial Arts
25
Jul

TURKEY MOUNTAIN MEDITATION HIKING

​July 9, 2017

1. Place feet shoulder width apart and look gradually to the end of the horizon
2. Straighten your spine from your tail bone up to your neck, and close your eyes
3. Relax your facial muscles, shoulders, chest and abdominal muscles
4. Slowly rise both hands in front of your belly button, with fingertips touching each other
5. Bring your attention to your fingertips and feel the pulse on each one.

6. Slowly move your palms apart, and then closer (repeating continuously)
7. Stay focused on palm sensations

8. Slowly rotate your palms so that one palms is above the other (without touching)
9. Rise your top palm up to your forehead, and then down again toward the bottom palm, repeat
10. Rotate your palms (palm that was on top is now on the bottom), and repeat #9
11. Stay focused on the magnetic force between the palms.

12. Slowly rise both hands to the side of your head
13. Make circles surrounding your brain
14. Feel the sensations in your brain

15. Slowly bring your palms in front of the upper abdomen area with both palms facing up
16. Feel the weight on your palms

17. Slowly open your eyes, compare your condition before meditation and after

18
Jul

HST Turkey Mountain Hike

July HST was held on a beautiful Sunday morning at Turkey Mountain, near Yorktown Heights, NY.

Approximately 25 participants, including a few parents and Masters, met up at 8am. We climbed up the blue trail at a comfortable pace for approximately 1.5 miles, reaching the top in less than 40 minutes. The peak offered sweeping views of the Manhattan skyline as well as the Croton Reservoir.
After admiring the view and enjoying a refreshing drink, Master Yoo proceeded to guide us through some meditation. We eased into relaxation and deep focus on specific parts of our body, including fingertips for pulse sensation, moving palms together and apart to experience magnetic resistance, heat, warmth, etc. while levelling emotions. We finished with palms surrounding our head and visualizing cleansing all four corners of the brain.
After about 20 minutes of meditation we proceeded back to the bottom following the white trail and reaching the parking lot (0.7 miles). Everyone looked energized and refreshed, and the day was still young as the hike was completed by 10am. We thank all participants and hope you share this experience with your families and friends.
Please leave your comments on Yoo’s Martial Arts Facebook by going to www.yoosma.com and clicking on the Facebook link.